Tsuki Knife Review

Looking for a Tsuki knife review?

Then you have come to the right place.

We have taken a look at 5 Tsuki knives and after using them for a period of time, outlined our own thoughts on the quality of these knives.

We should start off by saying that we have a strong suspicion that these knives are not actually true Japanese Knives.

What makes us say that?

Well firstly, you will struggle to find a true Japanese knife anywhere for under £100.

And secondly, on the box that these knives come in it says “Made In China”.

Bit of a giveaway there.

What likely happens is the VG10 steel blade is made in Japan, but the actual knife is assembled in China. Whilst there is nothing really wrong with this, it’s worth knowing you are not actually buying a true Japanese knife.

Anyway, despite not being made in Japan, it’s clear that the Tsuki knives are made in the Japanese style, but how do they stack up against the real thing? Let’s take a look….

Tsuki Knife Review - Our Top Picks

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Product

Features

Recommended Products

  • Stainless Steel
  • 210 grams
  • 17.78cm
  • Stainless Steel
  • 220 grams
  • 20.32cm

Tsuki CF842 Japanese Bread Knife

4/5
  • Stainless Steel
  • 190 grams
  • 20.32cm

An Indepth Look At Tsuki Knives

Tsuki CF841 Japanese Chef Knife

Tsuki Knife - Chefs Knife

Features

Rating

Price

  • Blade Material: Stainless Steel
  • Colour: Silver
  • Handle Material: Resin
  • Weight: 220 Grams
  • Length: 20.32cm
4/5

Tsuki CF841 Japanese Chef Knife Review

A modern day chef’s knife is the swiss army knife of any chef. It should be a multi-purpose knife that is capable of performing various different tasks in the kitchen. Things like mincing garlic, dicing onions, chopping peppers, slicing meat, and more.

So it’s important that any chef’s knife you buy is of the highest-quality you can afford. Whilst not being top of the range, the Tsuki chef knife is still a great option for anyone looking for a high-quality knife.

The pattern on the blade itself is magnificent and the quality of the handle can be felt every time you pick it up. We used this Tsuki knife extensively during the testing process and never had any issues with comfort or the like.

Overall, the Tsuki chef’s knife holds it’s edge quite well and maintains it’s razor sharp edge even after extended use. If you are looking for a decent chef’s knife that is not going to break the bank, then this Tsuki knife is the one for you.

Tsuki CF844 Japanese Santoku Knife

Tsuki Knife - Santoku Knife

Features

Rating

Price

  • Blade Material: Stainless Steel
  • Colour: Silver
  • Handle Material: Resin
  • Weight: 210 Grams
  • Length: 17.78cm
4.5/5

Tsuki CF844 Japanese Santoku Knife Review

The first thing to say about the Snatoku knife is the wonderfully designed pattern on the blade itself and the mirror-like core that beams as soon as you open the packaging. We were not expecting much based on the initial picture we saw but it looks much better in person.

But how does it cut I hear you ask. Well, the edge of the blade is razor sharp straight out of the box which is pretty unusual. In most cases, you’ll need to sharpen a blade as soon as it’s delivered but not the Tsuki Santoku. It made light work of everything I cut with it and was a pleasure to use thanks to it’s wonderfully designed, western style handle.

It’s worth pointing out that the handle itself is actually quite thin, so if you’d prefer a chunkier, more robust handle than perhaps this knife isn’t for you.

Overall, this Tsuki knife is a great quality knife that is also bargain.

Tsuki CF842 Japanese Bread Knife

Tsuki Knife - Bread Knife

Features

Rating

Price

  • Blade Material: Stainless Steel
  • Colour: Silver
  • Handle Material: Resin
  • Weight: 190 Grams
  • Length: 20.32cm
4.5/5

Tsuki CF842 Japanese Bread Knife Review

We found the Tsuki bread knife a decent enough knife that makes short work of even the toughest of loaves. The weight of this Tsuki knife feels right in your hands and the blade itself maintains it’s razor sharp edge even after continuous usage.

It’s worth remembering that Tsuki knives are not true Japanese Knives, however, for the price you will be hard pressed to find a comparable knife that delivers the same high-quality finish.

Tsuki CF843 Japanese Carving Knife

Tsuki Knife - Carving Knife

Features

Rating

Price

  • Blade Material: Stainless Steel
  • Colour: Silver
  • Handle Material: Resin
  • Weight: 190 Grams
  • Length: 20.32cm
5/5

Tsuki CF843 Japanese Carving Knife Review

The Tsuki carving knife is ideal for cutting and slicing meat. The blade itself is narrow and thin, much like many other carving knives on the market, and ensures an accurate cut each time you wield the blade.

We found this Tsuki knife maintains its sharpness quite well and the overall quality of the blade is great. Overall, out of all the Tsuki knives we tried, this one was probably the best suited to its original purpose.

Tsuki CF840 Japanese Cleaver

Tsuki Knife Cleaver

Features

Rating

Price

  • Blade Material: Stainless Steel
  • Colour: Silver
  • Handle Material: Resin
  • Weight: 250 Grams
  • Length: 16.51cm
3/5

Tsuki CF840 Japanese Cleaver Review

Much like the other Tsuki knives on our list, this knife really looks the part when you first open it up. The pattern on the blade is beautiful and you’ll find yourself mesmerized by the blade.

However, the Tsuk icleaver was actually quite dull when we first opened it up and had to carry out extensive sharpening before the blade would cut as desired. We also didn’t really like the handle, it just didn’t feel premium to us when we held it in our hands.

Overall, for the price this Tsuki clever is a decent enough addition to any kitchen, however, if you have the extra cash we’d recommend going for a true Japanese cleaver.

What Does Tsuki Say about their knives?

According to Tsuki themselves, all of their knives are made from layers upon layers of stainless steel and feature a Japanese VG-10 stainless steel core. This core has been hardened up to 60 degree Rockwell rating that provides a prolonged cutting performance.

The blades themselves are finished with two layers of damascus steel that cover the Japanese VG-10 core and protect it against corrosion. Tsuki knives also come with an ergonomic MI carta resin handle that will provide you with the ideal grip when cutting in the kitchen.

The final thing about Tsuki knives is that they mention they are endorsed by the craft guild of chefs by ensuring premium and long lasting quality.

What Is the Difference between Japanese Vs Western Knives?

There are many differences between Japanese style knives and western knives. The first of which is the Rockwell rating or Hardness rating. Generally, you will find western knives have a rockwell rating somewhere between 52-56 whereas your typical Japanese knife has a rockell rating between 58-65. The reason for this is that harder & better quality steel is used in the production of Japanese knives.

Another difference between western and Japanese knives is the fact that japanese Knives will need much less sharpening and maintenance when compared to their western counterparts. This is primarily due to the better quality steel used when forging the blade.

The type of steel used to forge the blade is also different in Japan. Traditionally, they use a hard steel with a backbone of soft iron to craft the blades. Most modern Japanese knives also have a three layered coating of Damascus steel which protects the blade from corrosion.

Western knives tend to be heavier than Japanese knives. This is due to the thicker and more robust blade needed to cut through western foods. Japanese knives on the other hand are much lighter and the blade itself is generally thinner. A reason for this could be because the majority of ingredients found in Japan tend to be more delicate than their western counterparts, so the need for a thick, robust blade was never needed.

The angle of Japanese knives is another factor that sets them apart from Western knives. Most Japanese blades are sharpened to a much finer angle at the cutting edge due to the harder steel used throughout the forging process.